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21.05.18  /  Extreme  /  Australia – Police Appeal To Find Missing Girl 12 From Melbourne's CBD

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21.05.18 Australia Police Appeal To Find Missing Girl 12 From Melbourne's CBD

A 12-year-old girl is still missing two weeks after disappearing from Melbourne's CBD.

According to a statement released by the Victoria police, Ritia Rikita was last seen in the city centre on May 9.

Due to her age, both police and family members are fearing for her safety.

The young girl, who is local to Melbourne's Inner West, is described as being 160cm tall with short black hair.

Ritia Rikita (pictured) is described as being 160cm tall with short black hair

Ritia Rikita (pictured) is described as being 160cm tall with short black hair

Rikita would often spend time in the Werribee, Point Cook and CBD areas and anyone who has information about her current location, or disappearance is urged to contact Westgate Proactive Police Unit on (03) 9742 9497.

 

19.05.18  /  Extreme  /  Australia – Coles Supermarket Issues Another Recall Of Ice Cream

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19.05.18 Australia Coles Supermarket Issues Another Recall Of Ice Cream

Coles supermarket has issued another recall of its own brand of ice cream, two weeks after it last warned shoppers to return the product because it was potentially contaminated.

Shoppers are advised not to consume Coles Mini Classics Vanilla six-pack ice creams that carry a best before date of April 17, 2020, due to the possibility of metal fragments.

The recalled product has been available for sale since 16 May 2018 in Coles Supermarkets and Coles Online in Queensland and New South Wales.

Shoppers are advised not to consumer Coles Mini Classics Vanilla six-pack ice creams that carry a best before date of April 17, 2020, due to the possibility of metal fragments

Shoppers are advised not to consumer Coles Mini Classics Vanilla six-pack ice creams that carry a best before date of April 17, 2020, due to the possibility of metal fragments

Coles recalled the Coles Mini Classic 360ml 6 pack in vanilla and almond flavours sold in Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and ACT

Coles recalled the Coles Mini Classic 360ml 6 pack in vanilla and almond flavours sold in Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and ACT

'Customers should not eat these products... due to the potential presence of metal fragments,' Coles said in a statement.

'Food products containing metal may cause injury if consumed.

Two weeks ago, the supermarket giant recalled the Coles Mini Classic 360ml 6 pack in vanilla and almond flavours sold in Coles Supermarkets, Coles Online and Coles Express in Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and ACT.

The affected almond packs have a best before date of 18 April 2020.

Anyone who bought the product is urged to go to their nearest Coles supermarket and return the product for a full refund.

 

19.05.18  /  News  /   – First Migraine-Prevention Drug Approved By Regulators

News

19.05.18 First Migraine-Prevention Drug Approved By Regulators

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The first migraine-prevention drug was approved by US regulators yesterday.

Due to be available within the next week, experts claim the injected medication, known as Aimovig, will 'change the way we treat migraines'. It is unclear if the drug may be available outside of the US.

The once-a-month treatment works by blocking the protein CGRP, which is elevated in migraine sufferers.

Unlike existing treatments that reduce CGRP levels, Aimovig, which is manufactured by pharma giants Amgen and Novartis, does not cause side effects, such as weight gain, sexual dysfunction and dry mouth.

Previous research suggests migraine drug side effects are often worse than the headaches themselves, with up to 86 percent of patients discontinuing treatment within a year.

Migraines affect more than 37 million people in the US. Around six million suffer in the UK.

US regulators approved the first migraine-prevention drug yesterday (stock)

US regulators approved the first migraine-prevention drug yesterday.

19.05.18  /  High  /  Australia – Phone Scam Alert

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19.05.18 Australia Phone Scam Alert

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Phone scammers posing as cash-savvy investors are extorting unwitting Australians out of hefty amounts of money, police have warned.

Victims of the scam reported receiving calls from someone who claimed to work for an investment company.

The caller conned their victims into believing that, as 'investors', they could generate substantial wealth on their behalf if they were given access to their money.

Phone scammers posing as cash-savvy investors are extorting unwitting Australians out of hefty amounts of money, police have warned

Phone scammers posing as cash-savvy investors are extorting unwitting Australians out of hefty amounts of money, police have warned

Victoria Police said the phone scammer was described as being 'forceful and insistent' as they instructed the victims to transfer 'large sums of money', Seven News reported.

Police are aware of at least two victims that have been extorted in this way.

This is the latest in a series of recent scams that have exploited communications technology to pilfer from people's pockets.

Victims of the scam reported receiving calls from someone who purported to work for an investment company, claiming they could generate substantial wealth for them if they were given access to their money

Victims of the scam reported receiving calls from someone who purported to work for an investment company, claiming they could generate substantial wealth for them if they were given access to their money

An email posing as a Telstra bill was doing the rounds recently, attempting to trick unsuspecting recipients into clicking on malicious links.

Last month, a phone scam allegedly conned numerous Chinese-Australians out of a total of $10 million, as callers pretended to be Chinese authorities and threatened deportation or arrest unless they were paid.

Earlier this year, a scam known as 'wangiri fraud' rorted victims out of money by leaving missed calls on their phones, prompting them to call back and subsequently charging them exorbitant line service fees.

 

19.05.18  /  News  /   – Surprising New Cancer Research Breakthrough

News

19.05.18 Surprising New Cancer Research Breakthrough

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A combination of Viagra and a flu vaccine could treat cancer, surprising new research suggests.

The unconventional strategy invigorates the immune system to attack tumor cells left lingering after surgery, when the body is vulnerable.

Testing the method in mice with lung cancer, Canadian researchers saw a 90 percent reduction in the spread of the disease.

The study was such a success that 24 human stomach cancer patients will now test the combination in a clinical trial that could pave the way to it being approved.

The team at the University of Ottawa found that erectile dysfunction drugs block suppressor cells, allowing natural killer cells to do their cancer-fighting job. The flu vaccine further invigorates the killer cells

The team at the University of Ottawa found that erectile dysfunction drugs block suppressor cells, allowing natural killer cells to do their cancer-fighting job. The flu vaccine further invigorates the killer cells

Normally, immune cells called natural killer cells play a major role in killing metastatic cancer cells.

But surgery causes another kind of immune cell, called a myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC), to block the NK cells.

Dr Rebecca Auer's team at the University of Ottawa has found that erectile dysfunction drugs block these suppressor cells, which allows the natural killer cells to do their cancer-fighting job.

The flu vaccine works to further stimulates the natural killer cells.

'Surgery is very effective in removing solid tumours,' said senior author Dr Auer, surgical oncologist and head of cancer research at The Ottawa Hospital.

 

18.05.18  /  Extreme  /   – CDC Health Alert

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18.05.18 CDC Health Alert

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Don’t drink the water.
Photo by Andrew Currie/Flickr

We already know that pools are gross, but hotel pools and hot tubs are especially gross, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported today. In fact, the water can be so contaminated that it’s been making thousands of Americans sick.

The CDC sorted through nearly 500 outbreaks linked to pools, spas, and waterparks that made more than 27,200 people sick and killed eight people between 2000 and 2014. Roughly one-third of those outbreaks were traced back to hotels, motels, inns, and lodges, according to the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. That means that the managers at vacation spots still have to do better at keeping their aquatic facilities clean. And the public can help by remembering one simple rule, the CDC says: “Don’t swim or let your kids swim if sick with diarrhea.”

More than half of the outbreaks linked to hotel pools and spas were confirmed to be infections. Culprits included bacteria like Legionella, which can cause a dangerous pneumonia or a less-severe flu-like illness when people inhale contaminated water droplets, and Pseudomonas, which can cause skin rashes and swimmer’s ear when people touch tainted water. The other major culprit was a parasite called Cryptosporidium, which causes contagious diarrhea when people swallow water that has infected poop in it.

Image: CDC

Outbreaks occur when these bugs escape the killing powers of chemical disinfectants. Chlorine and bromine are usually enough to kill Legionella and Pseudomonas, but these bugs can survive in dirty pools by forming a tough layer of gooey sludge known as a biofilm — especially when the disinfectants aren’t strong enough. The hardest to kill, though, is Cryptosporidium. At the concentrations of chlorine the CDC recommends, most bugs die in minutes, but Crypto can survive for more than seven days, the CDC says.

The best way to stop Crypto is to prevent contamination in the first place, which means stopping people with diarrhea from getting into the water. Local public health departments as well as the CDC have been working to raise awareness, and the good news is that it seems to be working: while outbreaks of Cryptosporidium climbed between 2000 and 2007, they plateaued after that. Skin rashes caused by Pseudomonas also seem to be dropping.

However, from 2000 to 2014, the number of diagnosed Legionella cases went up. That could be because public health officials and clinicians might be better at spotting infections with this particular bug. But it could also be because the number of people vulnerable to Legionella — people over 50, with compromised immune systems, or with lung disease — is climbing.

To be extra safe, the CDC recommends that people who know they’re at risk for Legionnaires’ disease avoid hot tubs. The CDC also suggests that swimmers do their own mini inspection before getting in the water, using chlorine and acidity tests you can buy at a pool supply store. But you have to wonder why this is up to the swimmer.

“State and local communities individually determine design, construction, operation, and maintenance standards for public pools, hot tubs, and water playgrounds,” Michele Hlavsa, chief of CDC’s Healthy Swimming Program, told The Verge in an email. And communities can “voluntarily adopt” the CDC’s guidelines for keeping recreational water facilities healthy and safe, Hlavsa says. Still, given the regular reminders the CDC sends out about how gross pools, spas, and water parks are — all these measures don’t seem like enough.

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