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23.05.18  /  Extreme  /  Congo, Democratic Republic of the – Experimental Vaccine Helping Stem The Tide Of Ebola

Extreme

23.05.18 Congo, Democratic Republic of the Experimental Vaccine Helping Stem The Tide Of Ebola

Image result for WHO

An experimental vaccine has been shipped into the Democratic Republic of Congo to stem the tide of the Ebola outbreak gripping the country.

Health workers in the DRC have begun an widespread immunisation campaign in an effort to stop the disease in its tracks as 27 people have already died from the current outbreak.

The experimental vaccine proved effective when used in limited trials during the epidemic which struck West Africa in 2014-16.

Health workers were among the first to receive the vaccine on Monday and it is now being distributed among the families of those who have already died from the illness.

 

A health worker preparing a potentially life-saving Ebola vaccine in Mbandaka, Congo on Monday

A health worker preparing a potentially life-saving Ebola vaccine in Mbandaka, Congo on Monday

Health workers administering the vaccine to other volunteers so they will be able to give it to members of the public without fear of infection

Health workers administering the vaccine to other volunteers so they will be able to give it to members of the public without fear of infection

The WHO has this week begun administering vaccines in the Democratic Republic of Congo, starting in the north-western city of Mbandaka, a provincial capital with a similar population to Perth or Adelaide.

The initial targets of the vaccination program are health workers and family members of the deceased, and more than 4,000 doses have already been shipped to the country from WHO headquarters in Switzerland.

The WHO admits the fact the ebola outbreak has spread in the past two weeks from a remote part of the country to an important administrative centre is cause for concern.

'One of the big differences is that West African health systems had not known ebola epidemics before,' Mr Jasaravic said.

'You had health workers who were not trained to deal with the ebola virus, and those health systems were also very weak.

'And really from day one they have started to coordinate all the partners to make sure all pieces are carried out as fast as possible.'

 

23.05.18  /  Extreme  /   – Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Dangerous Progress Continues

Extreme

23.05.18 Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Dangerous Progress Continues

Molten lava from the erupting Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island crept onto a geothermal power plant on Monday, as workers rushed to shut down the facility to prevent the uncontrollable release of toxic gases.

It is the latest danger from Mount Kilauea's eruption, which geologists say is among the worst events in a century from one of the world's most active volcanoes.

Crews worked into the night to cap the 11th and final well at the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plant, which provides about 25 percent of the Big Island's power.

Governor David Ige revealed on Tuesday morning that the closest lava front was about 100 yards from the plant as officials feared it could trigger the release of deadly hydrogen sulfate gas.

Molten lava from the erupting Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island crept onto a geothermal power plant (pictured) on Monday, as workers rushed to shut down the facility to prevent the uncontrollable release of toxic gases

Molten lava from the erupting Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island crept onto a geothermal power plant (pictured) on Monday, as workers rushed to shut down the facility to prevent the uncontrollable release of toxic gases

Workers tried to shut down the plant's three wells, which at 6,000 feet to 8,000 feet underground tap into extremely hot water and steam used to run turbines and produce electricity 

Workers tried to shut down the plant's three wells, which at 6,000 feet to 8,000 feet underground tap into extremely hot water and steam used to run turbines and produce electricity

 The PGV plant has been closed since shortly after the eruptions began on May 3 and some 60,000 gallons of the flammable chemical pentane used in the plant's turbines have already been relocated

 The PGV plant has been closed since shortly after the eruptions began on May 3 and some 60,000 gallons of the flammable chemical pentane used in the plant's turbines have already been relocated

Crews worked into the night to cap the 11th and final well at the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plant, which provides about 25 percent of the Big Island's power

Crews worked into the night to cap the 11th and final well at the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plant, which provides about 25 percent of the Big Island's power

'It's not easy to predict where it's going to go, and when it's going to get there,' Tom Travis, of Hawaii Emergency Management, told CBS News.

Flammable liquids have already been removed and the wells have been filled with cold water, but won't be plugged until Tuesday. A worst-case scenario could be catastrophic if lava hits one of the wells.

'There's a steam release, many chemicals, but primarily hydrogen sulfate, a very deadly gas,' Travis said.

The PGV plant has been closed since shortly after the eruptions began on May 3 and some 60,000 gallons of the flammable chemical pentane used in the plant's turbines have already been relocated.

 

23.05.18  /  High  /  Honduras – Private Jet Crash At Notorious Tegucigalpa Airport

High

23.05.18 Honduras Private Jet Crash At Notorious Tegucigalpa Airport

A private jet crashed off the end of the runway of the international airport in Honduras' capital on Tuesday, but the crew and passengers were rescued and reportedly out of danger, according to Honduras' emergency management agency.

Photographs posted by the agency show a twin-engined white Gulfstream 200 jet that appeared broken in half near the center. Firefighters sprayed foam onto the crash and part of the plane appeared to lie across a street.

The FlightAware website said the flight originated in Austin, Texas, Tuesday morning.

Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane registered to TVPX Aircraft Solutions Inc. in North Salt Lake, Utah.

A white Gulfstream jet that appears broken in half near the center, lies engulfed in foam sprayed by firefighters, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Tuesday, May 22, 2018

A white Gulfstream jet that appears broken in half near the center, lies engulfed in foam sprayed by firefighters, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Tuesday, May 22, 2018

The emergency agency said through Twitter that first responders rescued passengers and crew.

It did not provide the number of those aboard, but said all were alive.

Honduras firefighters posted photos of the crash and said there were nine people injured.

Video from the scene showed what appeared to be area residents pulling people out of the damaged fuselage while others sprayed the plane with handheld fire extinguishers.

Tegucigalpa's airport has long been notorious as one of the more difficult approaches in the hemisphere, surrounded by mountaintops and residential neighborhoods.

Authorities asked drivers to avoid the area.

The private jet crashed off the end of the runway at Tegucigalpa's airport Tuesday, but the crew and passengers were rescued and reportedly out of danger

The private jet crashed off the end of the runway at Tegucigalpa's airport Tuesday, but the crew and passengers were rescued and reportedly out of danger

Nine people were injured in the white Gulfstream's accident

Nine people were injured in the white Gulfstream's accident

Tegucigalpa's airport has long been notorious as one of the more difficult approaches in the hemisphere 

Tegucigalpa's airport has long been notorious as one of the more difficult approaches in the hemisphere

 

23.05.18  /  News  /  Australia – South Africans Applying For Australian Humanitarian Visas

News

23.05.18 Australia South Africans Applying For Australian Humanitarian Visas

More than 200 South Africans are in the process of applying for Australian humanitarian visas.

There are a total of 89 applications relating to 213 people, a Senate committee has been told.

'The type of criteria they of course have to meet - or the key one - is evidence of persecution, so that's exactly what we will be looking at,' Home Affairs deputy secretary Malisa Golightly said in Canberra on Tuesday.

More than 200 South Africans are in the process of applying for Australian humanitarian visas (Pictured: protesting farmers in South Africa)

More than 200 South Africans are in the process of applying for Australian humanitarian visas (Pictured: protesting farmers in South Africa)

There are a total of 89 applications relating to 213 people, a Senate committee has been told (Pictured: protesting farmers)

There are a total of 89 applications relating to 213 people, a Senate committee has been told (Pictured: protesting farmers)

The applications come as Immigration Minister Peter Dutton says persecuted South African farmers are 'not too far off' from being fast-tracked into Australia.

 

23.05.18  /  Extreme  /  Australia – The Most Senior Catholic Official Guilty Of Covering Up Child Sex Abuse

Extreme

23.05.18 Australia The Most Senior Catholic Official Guilty Of Covering Up Child Sex Abuse

Archbishop Philip Wilson, the most senior Catholic official in the world to be charged with covering up child sexual abuse, has been found guilty.

Magistrate Robert Stone told Newcastle Local Court on Tuesday Wilson had concealed the abuse of two altar boys in the NSW Hunter region by paedophile priest James Fletcher by failing to report the allegations to police.

Mr Stone said he was satisfied one of the altar boys, Peter Creigh, had been a 'truthful and reliable' witness.

In a statement issued by the Catholic Church, Wilson said he was 'disappointed' by the decision.

Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson (pictured, centre, outside court on Tuesday) faces a maximum two years' jail after he was convicted of concealing the abuse of altar boys during the 1970s

Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson (pictured, centre, outside court on Tuesday) faces a maximum two years' jail after he was convicted of concealing the abuse of altar boys during the 1970s

'I will now have to consider the reasons and consult closely with my lawyers to determine the next steps,' he said.

Prosecutors successfully argued Wilson covered up the abuse of four boys by now-dead paedophile priest James Fletcher (pictured) in the NSW Hunter region

Prosecutors successfully argued Wilson covered up the abuse of four boys by now-dead paedophile priest James Fletcher (pictured) in the NSW Hunter region

Prosecutor Gareth Harrison had claimed Wilson was involved in a cover-up to protect the church's reputation and there were doubts about his honesty.

Mr Harrison argued that in Wilson's mind victims came second.

Wilson, 67, who is suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease but claims medication has helped his memory, told the court during his landmark magistrate-only trial he could not remember Mr Creigh and another altar boy telling him in 1976 they were abused by Fletcher.

The prosecution argued Wilson failed to give details to police about a serious indictable offence after Fletcher was arrested in 2004 and went on trial for preying on another young boy.

Fletcher was found guilty in December 2004 of nine counts of child sexual abuse. He died in jail of a stroke in January 2006.

But the defence claimed Wilson was not guilty because the case was circumstantial and there was no evidence to prove the archbishop was told about the abuse, believed it was true or remembered being told about it.

Victim Peter Creigh embraces family members outside the Newcastle Court on Tuesday

Victim Peter Creigh embraces family members outside the Newcastle Court on Tuesday

Archbishop Philip Wilson is pictured (left) arriving at Newcastle Local Court on Tuesday

Archbishop Philip Wilson is pictured (left) arriving at Newcastle Local Court on Tuesday

Defence barrister Stephen Odgers SC urged the magistrate to take into account that back in the 1970s a priest having sex with a boy was not considered a serious indictable offence.

He said it would have been viewed as an act of indecency, not indecent assault, if the victim could not prove he had been forced to perform sex acts.

 

23.05.18  /  High  /   – Trump Puts Doubt On Kim Meeting

High

23.05.18 Trump Puts Doubt On Kim Meeting

Donald Trump hedged his bets Tuesday on the likelihood that his Kim summit would move forward telling reporters as he greeted the South Korean president, 'We'll soon know.'

Trump in the Oval Office told journalists asking about the June 12 summit minutes later, 'We’re moving along. We’ll see what happens. There are certain conditions we want to happen. I think we'll get those conditions.

He added, 'And if we don't, we won't have the meeting.'

'If it doesn’t happen, maybe it will happen later,' Trump said. 'Maybe it will happen at a different time.'

The U.S. president also said, 'There's a very substantial chance that it won't work out, and that's OK.'

South Korea's Moon Jae-in and Trump are meeting today at the White House for a round of talks that will almost certainly define the position of the U.S. president on the future of the sit-down he planned to have with Kim in Singapore next month.

The New York Times reported Sunday that Trump was considering backing out of the face-to-face talks that could turn into an embarrassment for him.

Trump is said to have surveyed aides the optics of Kim's own threats to cancel the June 12 meeting with Moon in a weekend phone call.

President Trump hedged his bets Tuesday on the likelihood that his Kim summit wouldn't collapse telling reporters as he greeted the South Korean president, 'We'll soon know'

President Trump hedged his bets Tuesday on the likelihood that his Kim summit wouldn't collapse telling reporters as he greeted the South Korean president, 'We'll soon know'

Chung Eui-yong, national security adviser to Moon, told reporters en route to Washington that he was not only on the call 'no such thing happened' and he is '99.9 percent' sure the meeting in Singapore will move forward.

'We have perceived none of that,' Chung said of reported nervousness on the part of the U.S.

Trump said Tuesday for the first time that the summit could happen, just at a later date. 'It may not work out for June 12,' he said.

He said that he doesn't 'want to waste a lot of time' on talks and suspects that Kim doesn't either.

 
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